Thursday 1st June

| BY Jack Moss

10 To Watch: Central Saint Martins BA

The whiff of young talent does something to us here at Ten HQ that’s akin to the chemical effect of pheromones on a pubescent teenage boy. It gets us very excited. Such was the case at last night’s Central Saint Martins BA press show, where a parade of nubile designers showed us their wares via an eight look demonstration of their final collections. As always, some brill stuff and, whilst we would like to shove all 40-or-so designers into the below we quite frankly don’t have the time. So we narrowed it down to ten. Ten young designers to watch. Expect big things kids.

Goom Heo

This was good. Ideas, but real clothes too – an amazing power-shouldered coat, kinky little pop socks, brilliant stacked t-shirts. Plenty of colour. Goom took home the big prize – that for L’Oréal Professionnel Young Talent Award – which was totally well deserved.

Goon Heo

Daniel John Sanson

Tory tarts – think: amped up Tara Palmer Tompkinson circa 1995. Insta moment of the night – a sort of Theresa May-cum-Maggie Thatcher figure being lifted on a throne by several thonged muscle men with “Tory Hunks” written on their backs. Sold.

Daniel John Sansom

Matt Dyer

Matty Dyer worked for Vetements, and you could see the influence. There were echoes of the Paris house here – the way they make clothes at once recognisable, at another, totally new. A play with with corporate branding, too – here, that of “Central Saint Martins”, found on the crotches of trousers and on clear carrier bags.

Matt Dyer

Mowalola Ogunlesi

This was based on the way that men dress in Lagos, Africa, apparently. Silhouette was slim and lean, consisting mainly of pinched biker jackets and lean leather trousers, spray painted or printed, revealed bits of oiled chest and ab. Extra points for the flashes of lacey knicker, revealed by the curved (can we say pubic-bearing?) waistband.

Mowalola Ogunlesi

Tolu Cocker

Good casting here. Boys wore these great printed leathers, girls this lacey sheer fabric, ending up as a sweeping tulle gown replete with crystal collar. Could we call it a bit mid-1990s VMAs? Yes, yes we will.

Tolu Cocker

Sarah Ansah

Clothes were good, following that sort of ultra-femme nineties thing that’s just about everywhere at the mo – but really this one was all about the shoes. Heeled-courts, made from this metallic material that fell away into puddles, as if they were melting.

Sarah Ansah

Aled Owen

Correct us if we’re wrong but this was set to the soundtrack of Baccara’s Yes Sir I Can Boogie, which is officially the best song of all time. Collection similarly uplifting -these puffy, colourful forms, where the density of detail was revealed with each look.

Aled Owen

Kristofer Englund

We believe this is what you might call avant-garde. As in, clothes to appreciate, less to wear. Big, totemic forms that were covered in branches, a bit like they’d been doing naughty things in the woods.

Kristofer Englund

Kévin Germanier

This was a properly tight collection, based on a play on one theme – that theme being these shimmering, almost lurex-like fabrics that were tipped with puffs of feather and made into naughty body-bearing party dresses that fell away in patches, revealing the women’s (and one very svelte man’s) forms beneath.

Kevin Germanier

Jae Yoo

There’s all these rules about wearing yellow (blonde hair, ginger, too fat, too old) – but this was a just about the best proposition for the colour we’ve seen. Yes, there were blues too, but this was all about that fluoro yellow bee-keeper opening look. Because whilst we a proponents of body-ody-ody , sometimes it’s rather less gauche to just cover it up.

Jae Woo